Monday, October 25, 2010

Ramen with Two Bean Ragout & NY Strip Steak

My guess is that you won't find ramen noodles served like this very often. I love noodles. I could live off noodles. Here I took a queue from David Chang and just “put stuff on the plate that tastes good.” I am not much into tradition or labels. I think food should be labeled one of two ways; tastes good or tastes like shit. The whole point of cooking, apart from sustenance, is to experiment and push food forward. Not stay stagnant and keep doing the same tired crap.

This particular two bean ragout is incredibly flavorful, but you must take the time to develop the complex flavor profile. This is not a “30 Minute Meal.” The two beans used were black beans and canary beans. Also I made my own organic pork sausage. Anything homemade is better than store bought, especially sausage. What the hell is in an economy store bought banger? Nothing good. Making it at home you can choose your own wholesome cuts of meat and blend your own spices. It really is not a difficult process. Maybe down the line I’ll post my sausage making tutorial. That just sounds wrong…

The final component of the dish is a NY strip steak. Here I used a counter-intuitive cooking method for the steak. Normally, we sear the outside of the steak at a very high temperature and then finish cooking the inside in the oven at a lower temperature. In my many, many travels on the net furthering my cooking knowledge base, I came across a study that gauged the loss of moisture or “juices” in meat during the cooking process. Please, never again say that you sear meat to “SEAL IN THE JUICES” that is just a ridiculous kitchen myth that been propagated for years and debunked on more than 100 occasions. You lose juices, no getting around that. The question becomes can you minimize it?  For more information read the work of Heston Blumenthal and Harold McGee it is readily available online.

Here's the method.  After seasoning, put the steak in a low oven for 40 minutes; supposedly this gelatinizes the juices in the meat. Then sear the steak on a very hot pan to caramelize the outside and get that crusty exterior. Now, I am not a scientist, but I can report that the meat was really nice and juicy.

Lastly, if you need a tutorial on cooking ramen noodles, get a take-away!

Enjoy…

Ramen with Two Bean Ragout & NY Strip Steak


For the Two Bean Ragout:
Blended oil
1 large white onion – chopped
1 red bell pepper – chopped
2 leeks (white & light green parts only) – chopped
2 shallots
24 oz organic pork sausage
8 oz tomato paste
16 oz whole milk
500 ml white wine
Sea salt
Black pepper
Ground cumin
Ground coriander

15 oz canned black beans – rinsed
15 oz canned canary beans - rinsed

In a thick enamel pot, heat blended oil over medium heat. Add the onion, red bell pepper, and carrots. Season with salt, pepper, cumin, and coriander. Cook for about 30 minutes. Get some good color on the veg. Add the sausage and a touch of more blended oil. Cook until brown and rendered. 40 minutes. Add the tomato paste. Scrape any browned bits in the bottom of the pot. Cook for 20 minutes.

Deglaze the pot with the whole milk. Quickly scrape off the brown bits, the milk will evaporate fast. Add the white wine. Re-season with pepper, cumin, and coriander. Add the black and canary beans. Reduce the heat. Cover with a parchment lid and cook for 40 minutes to 1 hour, or to the desired consistency. Check for seasoning.


For the NY Strip Steak:
NY strip steak
Safflower oil
Smoked pimenton
Onion powder
Black pepper
Sea salt

Preheat oven to 200 F. Coat the steak with safflower oil. Season with smoked pimenton, onion powder, black pepper, sea salt. Cook steak in oven for 40 minutes.

When the meat is about 10 minutes out, heat a cast iron skillet over medium-high heat. Add some blended oil. Remove the steak from the oven. Sear the steak for 2 minutes per side to caramelize the exterior. Remove to a wire rack to rest for 10 minutes. Slice the meat thinly and season with sea salt.


That’s it for now…till we exchange a few words again…Peace!

25 comments:

  1. I so agree with the searing of steak...Now I know I am not a meat eater, but I have cooked plenty of meat...and I think this is right on. People opt for methods that clearly dehydrate the meats. These searing methods, in my opinion, can optimize flavor but the method you are describing would most definitely optimize.
    Love the Ragout and the preparation. I like that you deglazed with milk then added wine, rather than using the wine to deglaze...I sense a richness there :)

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  2. OMG that dish looks delicious - my kind of meal! Love the way you cooked the NY Strip too, will have to try and the beans souns amazing too. Fabulous post!

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  3. To be honest, I had to google what smoked pimenton was (blush). That's ok though, that's exactly why I'm here, to learn. I can imagine what great flavors your steak has. Thank you for the tip on how to minimize juice loss, I'll have to try that next time. I've never thought of pairing steak with ramen before, what a great combo with the two bean ragout as well.

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  4. You're absolutely right - I have never seen or eaten ramen served like this!

    Love the ragout and the steak seasoning. David Chang is amazing (I have read the Momofuku cookbook) and this dish would not be out of place on his menu......

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  5. my goodness what a fabulous gourmet you are just amazing! this looks fantastic bravo to you!

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  6. Lazaro, your steak looks delicious and cooked to our liking. I'll have to show it to my steak man. I know he'll want to give it a try.

    I enjoy reading Harold MeGee too. His new book is on our Christmas list.
    Sam

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  7. A fabulous dish with ramen, the bean ragu, and the homemade sausage! And that steak on top looks just perfect!

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  8. I am most impressed with the home made sausage that barely no one does any more. Here there is a great tradition that is slowly fading of making your own sausage and all kinds of things. The science of cooking rests on great ingredients and just a couple of tricks!

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  9. this looks amazing. as always! love the presentation with the radishes!

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  10. I'm in awe that Ramen can look this amazing, Lazaro! I remember eating it in undergrad and it never looked like that, lol! By the way, I'd actually be interesting in your method and ideas on sausage-making. Mike and I don't eat pork and it can be seriously hard to find pork-free, good sausage.

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  11. I am definitely going to try that method for my my next steak dish. The whole dish looks great! And yes, a sausage making tutorial sounds wrong! haha. Great post!

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  12. But I NEED to know hot to cook Ramen Noodles, maaan! OK, silliness aside, this dish looks spectacular!!! I HAVE to try the method for cooking steak! I am all about new techniques. And I agree, the next time someone says searing meat seals in the juices, they should be mollywhopped! Great post, feeling even more inspired. I bought some canned beans for your pizza recipe last week. Now I don't know which to try first!

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  13. Lazaro, this one obviously goes into the "taste good" category! I think it's fantastic that you take the time to make your own sausage...you should definitely post a tutorial on that. Another beautiful dish!

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  14. LOL! "Sausage making tutorial" - yes, Lazaro. You simply MUST post that. :-)

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  15. Loved the addition of smoked pimentón. What degree of pungency did you use?
    Whenever I am in Portugal, always cross the border to buy their pimentón. The Spanish pimentón is the real stuff, I reckon. Who knows I am not a specialist either ♥

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  16. Searing doesn't seal in juices that's for sure. It adds color and texture, which can be just the same if done after cooking the meat through, so your method makes a lot of sense! I love what you'd done with the ramen, definitely more appetizing than the traditional package directions, haha.

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  17. I love Ramen & I like how you pair the noodle with Steak. I've always taken Ramen in soup & seeing this is interesting for me. Great work!

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  18. Looks really good! A tutorial on sausage making would be awesome I think:)

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  19. Really yummy! Great recipe! I will try it out for sure!

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  20. Looks delicious, I love the two bean ragout with the Ramen noodles, you're once again making me hungry! I should probably only look at your site after a big meal so as to control my cravings, lol!

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  21. I have just started following you and I must say I look forward to your posts. You are informative and at the sam time you make me laugh. As my mom would say "no tienes pelos en la lengua".

    I am going to try this mehod of cooking meat.

    Everything looks deliciuos.

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  22. I have to disagree with this: "tastes good or tastes like shit". There's definitely a middle ground, there! I've had loads of food (mainly at subpar restaurants) that weren't exactly good but weren't necessarily BAD, either. Edible, but but a bit lacking in the flavor department. ;)

    I rarely deal with whole pieces of beef, so maybe I have an excuse, but I definitely believed the "searing seals in juices" myth. :O I'll keep your method in mind the next time I do! And no, I've definitely never had ramen like this before. It looks great. :)

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  23. Your culinary creativity never ceases to amaze me. Don't ever stop because you are a source of inspiration

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  24. Looking forward to trying a slightly modified version of this tonight with what I have on hand!!

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  25. my goodness what a fabulous gourmet you are just amazing! this looks fantastic bravo to you!

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