Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Guest Post Spotlight: Osmanthus Tea Mousse

Guest Post Spotlight:

This week hailing from Singapore is the very sweet & talented Ann from Anncoo Journal.  On her wonderful blog she specializes in three things...

  • Cook
  • Bake
  • Handicraft
This is confirmed by her two nieces, Kay Yi & Peck Peck when they say, "Other than her culinary skills, my aunt also enjoys handicrafts.  All in all, we think our aunt is a truly amazing lady."

Both in her sweet...




And savory dishes...


I've always found Ann's food to be creative, precise, and fun.  She cooks from the heart and takes great care with presentation.  Her photography is magnificent.

Please stop by Anncoo Journal and you will see exactly what I am yapping about.

Hello Lazaro Cooks readers!

I'm Ann from Anncoo Journal, Singapore. I'm thrilled and excited when Lazaro invited me to do a guest post for his beautiful blog. I remember I first visited Lazaro Cooks when Lazaro left me a friendly comment at Cook Eat Share. I'm very much inspired by Lazaro's passion for cooking and totally agree with him - "Cooking is a pleasure, a philosophy, a way of life, not a job or a recipe."

Many of you in the west may not be familiar with Osmanthus. Osmanthus (name as "gui hua" in Chinese) is a golden flower native to China that is valued for its apricot aroma. One can easily smell the distinctive unforgettable aromatic fragrance from afar. Osmanthus flowers are very common ingredients in Chinese cuisine and the flowers are also used to produce osmanthus-scented jam, sweet cakes, dumpling, soups and even liquor. So today, I'm very honoured to present you this healthy fragrant dessert - Osmanthus Tea Mousse.


Here is the recipe
  • 3 tbsp Dried Osmanthus
  • 2 tbsp Osmanthus jam
  • 1 cup Boiling water
  • 1 tbsp Gelatine powder soak with 2 tbsp water
  • 2 tbsp (about 30g) Sugar
  • 1/2 cup (125ml) Fresh milk
  • 1 cup (250ml) Whip topping cream




Method:
·        Bring one cup of water to boil, add dried osmanthus and sugar into it and place a lid on the pot, boil at medium heat for 5 minutes stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and let osmanthus to soak for 10 minutes.
·      Strain osmanthus and bring osmanthus tea to boil again, add soaked gelatine and 2 tbsp osmanthus jam, mix well till gelatine dissolved. Leave osmanthus tea to cool and pour in fresh milk - stir well.
·        Whisk topping cream to peak form and mix into the osmanthus tea mixture with a hand whisk.
·        Divide osmanthus tea mousse among small glasses. Refrigerate for about 2 hours.
·        Add 1 teaspoon of osmanthus jam on top of osmanthus tea mousse when serve.


Enjoy.

Please visit Ann over at Anncoo Journal.


That's it for now...till we exchange a few words again...Peace!


27 comments:

  1. She is indeed a talented cook!^^

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  2. Totally agreed that Ann's got a very beautiful blogs full of wonderful asian and western dishes..never fail to drool over her photos and of course this mousse is just as beautiful and looks so delicious!

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  3. Hi Lazaro,
    Thank you very much for having me on your blog today :)
    Have a wonderful day :))

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  4. Laz, kudos to u for bringing our talented S'pore blogger here :) I'm also a fan of Ann :)

    Ann, it's great to see u here too & I'm so proud of u! Well done :)

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  5. whoaa this is fantastic! i need to buy some osmanthus jam!

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  6. Yes, Ann is really a very talented and creative lady. This mousse looks so refreshing and her clicks are marvellous too.

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  7. Ann is a great cook who never fails to inspire me. Hopped to your blog through her and I'm glad to discover yours now. :)

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  8. Thanks for the introduction to a new ingredient... it sounds lovely and so does the recipe!!!

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  9. Oh I love Osmanthus!!! I remember eating them in a sweet soup along with rice cakes and poached egg. You brought back some really wonderful memories for me! The idea of a tea mousse is new to me and sounds absolutely amazing! Beautiful photos too.

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  10. ann, it's a brilliant idea to come up with this osmanthus tea mousse for your guest post becos just like you said, not many from the west actually aware of this flower. Me too, i just knew about this probably just 2 years back though we're here. Pleasant smell and creative idea to make them into this dessert.

    lazaroo: hi, nice to know you. I know her photographs are way beyond expectations. wonder if she's a part time photographer??

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  11. What a fabulous post! It's a pleasure to meet you Ann, you have a very charming site!
    I am not familiar with Osmanthus but this looks like a beautiful dessert.

    Cheers to you Laz, for showcasing Ann's creations. It's always exciting and inspiring to meet new foodie bloggers!

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  12. This looks like a wonderful dessert. Now I need to get busy making your osmanthus jam first! :D Always something good from you Ann!

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  13. Hi Lazaro! It's so nice to see Ann over here. I didn't know about Osmanthus until now and this looks very interesting! Ann's photos ALWAYS stand out and she's a great photographer. Not only I enjoy her photos, but her recipes are always creative and delicious too. It was a great post and I enjoyed reading it.

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  14. Hi Lazaro, I was so happy to see one of my favorite foodies being celebrated here on your blog! Ann is a dynamo of a cook and food stylist. I hope to someday visit Ann to taste some of her culinary genius but until then, thanks for letting us experience her talents in virtual time.

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  15. I know that tea mousse is something I would enjoy very much! Such a delicious post...Blessings, Catherine

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  16. Absolutely, Anncoo is the first blogger I came in contact with when I first started blogging. Her culinary skills amazes me and inspires me too.

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  17. Ann, it's great to learn about Osmanthus, and your mousse looks just lovely!

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  18. Hi Anncoo! Thanks for saving me some Google time. This looks wonderful. I love learning about new foods through your posts.

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  19. Thank you everyone for your awesome compliments and your support.

    Thanks again to Lazaro for the invitation to your site :)

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  20. Very interesting! The mousse looks wonderful and very light, I'd love to taste it. Great guest post!

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  21. I saw this one, isn't it fantastic!!! Love it!

    Ciao
    Alessandra

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  22. Hi Ann, so excited to see you here. I love this mousse and I am very intrigued by the osmanthus flowers. Stunning dessert :)

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  23. Ann is an amazing baker, crafter, and cook! I second this. Thanks for bringing back a spotlight for a talented blogger again, Laz.

    Hi Ann! I think I might this flower. It looks and sounds (as you described) familiar. I had it back home in Thailand. The tea mousse sounds very good and your presentation is beautiful!

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  24. Ann, you always have a way of making your recipes sound so easy, but yet present the final product so beautifully. I agree with Laz, you put a lot of heart into your cooking and it definitely shows. I'm familiar with Osmanthus tea, but not Osmanthus tea mousse. What an interesting recipe. This sounds lovely and refreshing. Thank you for sharing your talents with us here on Lazaro Cooks.

    Thanks again Laz!

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