Saturday, August 20, 2011

Tamago Omelet Meatloaf, Avocado-Yuzu Wasabi, Wok-Fried Fingerlings and Nori Butter

There is little in the blog world that makes me happier than collaborating with my 5 Star Makeover co-host Natasha the 5 Star Foodie.  Natasha is a wonderfully talented and creative cook.

What I respect most about her is that she is fearless in the kitchen.  She puts her exquisite palate to work concocting complexly layered flavor profiles.

Our challenge was to reimagine the classic meatloaf.  You can catch my dish on 5 Star Foodie.

Enjoy...

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Tamago Omelet Meatloaf, Avocado-Yuzu Wasabi, Wok-Fried Fingerlings and Nori Butter



It's always such a pleasure to work with Lazaro, who has been a great friend, the best 5 Star Makeover co-host, and an invaluable help in my recipe development projects. Of all my recipe development projects, our collaboration posts are always my favorite.

Our project this time was to create different gourmet versions of a classic meatloaf. Lazaro has a unique deconstructed concept of meatloaf, corn & potatoes which you can check out on my blog. I decided to make my meatloaf with a modern Japanese flare, with Japanese ingredients in every element of the dish.



The meatloaf itself is prepared with Panko breadcrumbs, Tamari (soy) sauce, and mirin. Inside the meatloaf is Tamago Omelet which is a sweet Japanese omelet typically used in sushi. The sauce for the meatloaf is a spicy Wasabi with avocado and Yuzu (Japanese citrus) juice. On a side, instead of regular mashed potatoes, I made fingerling potatoes fried in a wok and served with nori seaweed compound butter.



Ingredients:

nori butter
2 sheets nori, ground into powder
1/4 fleur de sel
3 tablespoons butter, softened

tamago omelet
3 eggs
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon mirin
2 tablepoons dashi stock
pinch of salt

meatloaf
1 pound ground grass-fed beef or wagyu beef
1/2 cup Panko
1 egg
1/2 onion, finely chopped
2 tablespoons Tamari (soy) sauce
2 tablespoon mirin
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Avocado-yuzu wasabi
1 avocado
3 tablespoons yuzu juice
1 tablespoon wasabi paste

wok-fried fingerlings
fingerling potato medley, each sliced in thin rounds
Salt to taste
Vegetable oil

fried gyoza strips
4-5 gyoza skins
Vegetable oil

Directions:

nori butter

In a small shallow bowl, combine one and a half tablespoons of nori powder with fler de sel.  Using a fork, incorporate butter into the nori salt, until the mixture is smooth.  Roll into a log in a plastic wrap. Chill until firm.  

tamago omelet

In a bowl, combine sugar, mirin, dashi stock and a pinch of salt.  Whisk together gently with a fork. 

Heat a skillet and brush with a little oil.   Pour the egg mixture in the skillet, cook on low-medium heat on one side only, until the liquid disappears.    Cool to room temperature. 

meatloaf

Pre-heat the oven to 375 degrees. In a large bowl, mix ground beef, panko breadcrumbs, onions, tamari, mirin, egg, and salt and pepper to taste. Spread in a layer on a foil.  Lay the omelet on top, and roll, forming a loaf.  Bake for about 45 minutes or until done.

Avocado-yuzu wasabi

In a food processor, mix avocado, yuzu and wasabi paste until smooth.  Refrigerate before serving.
wok-fried fingerlings

Heat a little bit of oil in a wok.   Add fingerling rounds, sprinkle with salt, and fry, stirring continuously until the potatoes are golden brown. 

fried gyoza strips

Cut gyoza skins into thin strips and fry in oil until golden brown.

to assemble:

Slice the meatloaf.  On the center of each plate, spread some avocado-yuzu wasabi, then place a meatloaf slice over, and top with another dollop of wasabi and a fried gyoza strip.   Arrange fingerling rounds in four stacks around the plate and top each stack with a dollop of nori butter.   

16 comments:

  1. I loved seeing both of your takes on such a classic dish! Both versions are simply beautiful! You are both so talented!

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  2. You guys are amazing. So many great ideas to purloin... and gorgeous to boot. fabu guys!

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  3. I'm always fascinated with the idea of eggs inside a meatloaf (like whole hard-boiled eggs hidden inside the loaf). I've never tried it but have been meaning to for years. This is such a creative take on the whole dish, and a new way of thinking of eggs inside the meatloaf. Great job, Natasha!

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  4. You two are awesome, I just wish I had more time to spend in the kitchen to be able to recreate the amazing dishes you turn out. I have to look no further than this page.

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  5. I bet it tasted heavenly.
    As always, love your plating style Natasha.
    LL

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  6. LUV Asian twist on classic American meatloaf dinner!

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  7. Just beautiful! I love the way you photograph your food, it's as if I could just reach out and grab it:D

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  8. We had cooking club last night-we have a member of our cooking club that creates the most amazing dishes with complex flavor combinations and artistry. As we were being wowed by his creation we agreed, that this was the difference between a good cook and being a chef. You both exhibit this same artistry and complexities to your food and I applaud you.

    Awesome.
    Velva

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  9. Goodness gracious - this is something from a 5 star restaurant! Wow...

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  10. This is such a fun take on meatloaf, Natasha! The Japanese flavors really add a special element. The avocado topping is the perfect finishing touch!

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  11. Adore this deconstruction with Asian flair. You two are excellent collaborators!

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  12. What a fantastic creation Natasha...beautifully done!

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  13. Amazing dish, Natasha! And I love your meatloaf croquette, Lazaro. Both of your takes on the classic meatloaf are fabulous. I just wish we could actually taste them, because they look so darn good.

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  14. What a pleasure to be getting a collaboration of you both! I definitely agree with Laz about Natasha being fearless in the kitchen, and this post just reassures that. I mean, who woulda thought Japanese when the word meatloaf is mentioned? Loving the Asian twist on this meatloaf, Natasha. Beautifully present as well. Laz, I'll be over to check out your meatloaf soon.

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